MirTesen.

MirTesen.
Can I polish the innermost mirror and leave spots on it? � Lao Jie.
How the people live now in happy Mongolia.
As part of the Vanishing Cultures Project, photographer Taylor Weidman drew attention to Mongolia and its endangered nomadic culture.
Until now, there are people who lead a nomadic life like the Genghis Khan, but now their existence has changed. On the one hand, the “load” of high technologies and the modern world dominate them, on the other – climatic perturbations and the expansion of deserts. Most nomads do not even have a basic education, which forces them to work in mines or other low-paid and difficult jobs in the event of forced settlement. Probably, the process of changes in the Mongolian society will drag on for a long time.
1. A shepherd on a motorcycle. Nomadic Mongols very quickly absorbed all the possibilities of high technology. (Taylor Weidman / The Vanishing Cultures Project)
2. The girl watches the attraction-riding families. (Taylor Weidman / The Vanishing Cultures Project)
3. A nomadic family inside their mobile home is a yurt. These families have TVs, DVD players, mobile phones; Solar panels are used for charging. (Taylor Weidman / The Vanishing Cultures Project)
4. The spectators and participants of the festival “Nadom”. (Taylor Weidman / The Vanishing Cultures Project)
5. The goat, exhausted from thirst in the desert, drinks water from the washing machine. Along with grazing, local families work in mines to provide additional income for solar panels, washing machines, etc. (Taylor Weidman / The Vanishing Cultures Project)
6. A woman feeds a lamb with milk from a bottle of soy sauce. (Taylor Weidman / The Vanishing Cultures Project)
7. Two young Mongols during the slaughter of goats and sheep in the countryside, where the resort is located for the rich townspeople. (Taylor Weidman / The Vanishing Cultures Project)
8. Wrestlers in the fight during the sports festival “Nadom”. Since ancient times, this event was held in honor of the new great conquests, now – just competitions in Mongolian wrestling, horse races and archery. (Taylor Weidman / The Vanishing Cultures Project)
9. Erosion of the fertile soil layer and expansion of the Gobi desert due to climatic changes in the region. (Taylor Weidman / The Vanishing Cultures Project)
10. The Mongolian shepherd leaves to take his cattle from pasture during a severe blizzard. Over the past ten years, Mongolia has experienced an unusually large number of jute – a massive cattle drop caused by icing of pastures. (Taylor Weidman / The Vanishing Cultures Project)
11. Bones of animals in somon Teshig, affected by jute. Winter of 2012 carried away about 30% of the local herds. (Taylor Weidman / The Vanishing Cultures Project)
12. After the closure of the large Soviet coal mine in Nalaiha, the city was covered by small coal-mining “holes”. Here, families work, who were forced to abandon the nomadic life. (Taylor Weidman / The Vanishing Cultures Project)
13. Working in mines, albeit dangerous, is an attractive employment option for former shepherds, whose educational level often goes beyond the primary school. (Taylor Weidman / The Vanishing Cultures Project)
14. Illegal miners are washing gold. (Taylor Weidman / The Vanishing Cultures Project)
15. Nomadic areas surrounding Ulan Bator. In winter, the Mongolian capital is one of the most polluted in the world due to the massive burning of coal. (Taylor Weidman / The Vanishing Cultures Project)
16. Residents of the “nomadic areas” of Ulan-Bator collect garbage for processing. Among them, a very high percentage of the unemployed due to lack of education. (Taylor Weidman / The Vanishing Cultures Project)
17. Mongolian boy carries home a bottle of water. (Taylor Weidman / The Vanishing Cultures Project)
18. View of the construction site in Ulan-Bator from the booth of the Ferris wheel in the City Children’s Park. Along with private enterprises, the Mongolian government plans to build 100,000 new housing units for low-income families. (Taylor Weidman / The Vanishing Cultures Project)
19. A slide in the Ulaanbaatar amusement park for children. More than a quarter of the country’s population did not reach the age of 14, which makes Mongolia one of the “youngest” countries in the world. (Taylor Weidman / The Vanishing Cultures Project)
20. Mongolian nomad cleans solar panels after snowfall. (Taylor Weidman / The Vanishing Cultures Project)
21. More recently, cars in Mongolia have been quite rare. Now they are a dime a dozen here. (Taylor Weidman / The Vanishing Cultures Project)
22. Residential areas of Ulan-Bator after the rain. (Taylor Weidman / The Vanishing Cultures Project)
23. One of the most beautiful buildings in Mongolia is the Blue Sky Tower. (Taylor Weidman / The Vanishing Cultures Project)
24. The Mongolian Stock Exchange, which has experienced unprecedented growth in the last few years. Back in 2006 it was the smallest in the world. Now over 300 companies with a total capitalization of $ 2.3 billion are registered here (Taylor Weidman / The Vanishing Cultures Project)
25. A small Ulaanbaatar shop. (Taylor Weidman / The Vanishing Cultures Project)
26. A Buddhist monk walks past an abandoned Soviet hospital in Ulan Bator. Buddhism once again became one of the aspects of the national identity of the Mongols after the disappearance of the influence of the USSR. (Taylor Weidman / The Vanishing Cultures Project)
27. Mother puts her son in a drip. During the Soviet era, the introduction of modern medicine in Mongolia led to a reduction in infant mortality and an increase in life expectancy. These factors led to a boom in population growth compared to the beginning of the 20th century. (Taylor Weidman / The Vanishing Cultures Project)
28. Guys lead their drunken comrade. According to the reports of the Ministry of Health of Mongolia, in 2006 about 22% of the country’s population was alcohol-dependent, which is three times more than the average European indicator. (Taylor Weidman / The Vanishing Cultures Project)
29. A woman is doing a warm-up on a hill, from where new areas of Ulan Bator are visible. The capital of the country is growing very fast due to the economic boom. Mongolia boasts the fastest growing economy in the world in 2011. (Taylor Weidman / The Vanishing Cultures Project)
Reactions to the article.
Comments.
Responses to the comment.
Responses to the comment.
Responses to the comment.
Shiva-Gobi – darkness vaasche. Link. The text is hidden deploy.
Responses to the comment.
Responses to the comment.
Responses to the comment.
Responses to the comment.
Responses to the comment.
Responses to the comment.
Responses to the comment.
Responses to the comment.
Responses to the comment.
Facebook comments.
& copy; 2018, I so see the Feedback.
Suspicious activity has been registered from your account. For your safety, we want to make sure that this is really you.